Car Park
Walking
Dogs
Cycling
Disabled Access
Cafe
Picnic
Horse Riding Toilets
Events
A4146 lay-by north of Leighton Linslade
A number of tracks through the wood
Must be kept under control.
Not permitted
Not suitable, some paths are very steep.
None
No facilities
Not permitted
None
None
None – parking on roadside only
Track around the wooded area
Must be kept under control.
Not permitted
Tracks not to a fully disabled standard
None
No facilities
No facilities
No facilities
Held throughout the year - 01525 237760
Car Park
Walking
Dogs
Cycling
Disabled Access
Cafe
Picnic
Horse Riding Toilets
Events
Linslade Wood is a small area of Ancient Semi-natural Woodland with large parts replanted with cherry and ash.  Entrance from the road is via a very steep flight of steps. It is surrounded on 3 sides by privately owned, relatively young woodland.  It is well known for its Bluebells in Spring and for varied birdlife throughout the year.
There are a number of paths through the woodland linking to neighbouring footpaths, the nearby Grand Union Canal and the Greensand Ridge Walk

Wrapped around an area of housing, Knolls Wood is an interesting area with an unusual mix of self-seeded native trees and planted exotic species.  It is an area of mixed ornamental woodland that was planted on former heathland during the 1800s. It is notable for its avenue of monkey puzzle trees and a range of other specimen trees including redwoods and wellingtonias.There is a local group that is involved in the management of the wood, information can be obtained from The Greensand Trust Rangers on 01525 237760

Car Park
Walking
Dogs
Cycling
Disabled Access
Cafe
Picnic
Horse Riding Toilets
Events
None – parking on roadside only.
A number of tracks through the wood
Permitted, must be kept under control
Not permitted
Tracks not to a fully disabled standard
None
No facilities
No facilities
No facilities
Held throughout the year - 01525 237760
Heath Wood and Meadow was planted as part of the landscaping of the plantation road area in the 1800s on a site that was previously heathland. This is an attractive site on the northern edge of Leighton Buzzard and includes mixed woodland, meadow and riverside habitats. The wildlife found here reflects this wide range of habitats and includes some rarities. The woodland includes native English trees such as oak and beech as well as scots pine and black locust trees. This is the only known Bedfordshire site for dwarf gorse, a relic heathland flora.

Access off Mentmore Road
Track and other paths around the lake
Permitted, must be kept under control
Permitted on main track around the lake
Track around site is to a disabled standard
None
Benches available in dog free area
No facilities
No facilities
Held throughout the year - 01525 237760
Car Park
Walking
Dogs
Cycling
Disabled Access
Cafe
Picnic
Horse Riding
Toilets
Events
Tiddenfoot Waterside Park is a disused sandpit containing a lake, areas of semi-improved acid and neutral grassland, scrub, woodland and a popular plantation. At approximately 13.4 ha, the park is roughly triangular in shape and is bordered on the east by the Grand Union Canal. The site is a designated County Wildlife Site.The site plays host to the annual Leighton Linslade Canal Festival arranged by Leighton Linslade Town Council and there are events throughout the year.
Fishing on the lake is under a lease with the Leighton Buzzard Angling Club.
Tiddenfoot Waterside Park Leaflet - 761kb pdf       Interpretive Panel - 515kb.jpg
Car Park
Walking
Dogs
Cycling
Disabled Access
Cafe
Picnic
Horse Riding
Toilets
Events
None.  Access from Leighton Linslade
A number of tracks across the meadows
Permitted, must be kept under control
Not permitted
Tracks not to a fully disabled standard
None
No facilities
No facilities
No facilities
Held throughout the year - 01525 237760
Access to the meadows is also possible via paths from neighbouring roads and also from the Globe Public House. The Meadows are the floodplain of the River Ouzel and are therefore subject to seasonal flooding. This contributes to the unique characteristics of the meadows and to the plant and animal communities found here.  The meadows support a range of plants typical of damp meadows including meadowsweet, cuckoo flower, marsh marigold and yellow iris. The reintroducing of cattle grazing has encouraged the spread of traditional meadow flowers and their associated wildlife. The old willows are being pollarded to ensure their survival. Interpretation Boards around the site explain details regarding grazing, the river and its floodplain and why flooding is good.
There are a number of tracks across the meadows with links to neighbouring footpaths and the Grand Union Canal towpath. The Greensand Ridge Walk goes through the site. A leaflet exists for the site. Ouzel Valley Leaflet - 421kb.pdf
Car Park
Walking
Dogs
Cycling
Disabled Access
Cafe
Picnic
Horse Riding
Toilets
Events